If you enjoy our forum, why not join us? :) Login removes all the ads too! Click here to register in a few simple steps

Login to remove this ad | Register Here
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Tools Used by me for RC builds/maintenance
#1
When I first started I never had much of an idea what I would need to use for this hobby. There is no öne"definative place to find such a list such as "Tools" needed. I have decided to kind of build a list of different things. This is my "Tool" List ...........so far.

I put together a sample tool list of actual products I use. I also provided links in case you need to purchase them. Note these are only examples, there are many products out there, but these are some of the basics you need.

None of the links in the list are "ässociate" links. I in no way try to make money off my fellow enthusiasts. These are straight links.

And if possible buy them from your local RC shop to support them!  If not there are many online stores available. Study up and decide which tools may best fit your needs. This list is intended to give a starting place of types of tools you may end up needing.

RC Build Tools:

Aoyue 2930 Programmable Lead Free Soldering Station

Aoyue Soldering Iron Tip Cleaner with Brass wire sponge, no water needed

SE MZ101B Helping Hand with Magnifying Glass

Aven 17542 Desoldering Wick, 2.5mm Width, 5' Length


          24-10 Ga. Wire Stripper/Cutter Tool


          Multiple sizes Heat Shrink


QX Aluminium Alloy Multifunctional Soldering Station XT60 XT90 T Banana Plug


 4 In 1 Hex Driver Screw Tools Set For RC Model


TEKTON 6655 Needle File Set, 10-Piece

Pixnor 5-in-1 High-precision Stainless Steel Tweezers Repair Tools Set (Silver)

Du-Bro 499 Tru-Spin Prop Balancer


Xacto X5282 Basic Knife Set

Precision Screwdriver set



Electronic / Software Tools:


EK2-0907 Updated Servo Tester Server Electronic Speed Controller


3.3V or 5.5V USB Programming Module for Naze / Minim OSD / Frsky / Multi-wii


FVT Favourite Little Bee Mini BLHeli ESC Parameter Adjustment Module USBlink Program Module


Remote Control Helicopter Spare parts Battery Monitor Alarm 1S-8S

WOOCON RC CellMeter-7 Digital Battery Capacity Checker LiPo LiFe Li-ion NiMH Nicd


Miscellaneous Tools:

360W 12V 30A Power supply

RadioLink CB86 Plus 6A 210W Lipo Balance Charger Discharger


Crafty World Pro Quality Cutting Mat 18 x 24"-60% Off Today - Sturdy Self Healing Mat is the Perfect Cutting Mat For All Arts & Crafts


.30 Caliber Ammo Can, Military Surplus (LIPO Battery Vault)
I am a developing Racer - getting better.....
BNF Quads: <250 Eachine>; <250 Walkera Advanced CC3D>; <250 Vortex Pro>
Built: Dronz Fury 252 RX ; Speed Addict 210-R
Building: <Deciding on Third build - Suggestions?>
[-] The following 1 user Likes Hebrews12v2's post:
  • BigglesFPV
#2
That's a very very nice set of tools! will stick this up in the "Useful Info" forum!
Don't be a LOS'er, be a FPV'er :) -- Blog - Facebook - Instagram - Twitter - Google Plus
Reply
#3
Nice list, I still prefer a normal sponge to the brass one.
Current quad: ZMR 250 / DYS SE2205 / Littlebee 20A ESCs / Drone Lab 1500 4S / Naze32 Rev5 / BF 2.7.1
FPV: Runcam Skyplus / Aomway 200mw VTX / Fatshark DomV1
>>>>>>>>>>Check Out My Build<<<<<<<<<<
Reply
Login to remove this ad | Register Here
#4
Looking for recommendations on a good flux pen for soldering. Was looking at some kester pens but which is best, there's a couple different kinds.
Reply
#5
My Dremel feels like he should make this list as well.
He reminded me how long he has had my back when I needed some muscle to modify and customize my RC parts. Wink
From light sanding to milling slots for velco straps. My Dremel is never far from the bench!
Almost endless amout of options when it comes to differeny types of attachments as well.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
The Obsession IS Real!
My Youtube channel. My Threads
Reply
#6
I find this desoldering tool works just as well or better than solder wick
http://www.ebay.ca/sch/i.html?_nkw=desol...der+sucker
Reply
Login to remove this ad | Register Here
#7
(20-Jan-2017, 11:40 PM)RENOV8R Wrote: I find this desoldering tool works just as well or better than solder wick
http://www.ebay.ca/sch/i.html?_nkw=desol...der+sucker
Whats the logevity of those? Is it cost effective vs the soldering wick?
Havent seen these before lol
The Obsession IS Real!
My Youtube channel. My Threads
Reply
#8
When working with connectors I can't stress the value of having the right crimpers/crimp tool for the job.  You may think that the old folding the tabs over with pliers trick works fine (and it does on some for a bit) but nothing beats the ease and strength of a crimp-type connector used properly.

You pay anything up to USD20 via Hobbyking or Banggood for a pair  (or from your local electronics supplier) - and it takes about 4 or 5 pairs to cover off just about all hobby electrical terminals, below are the 2 I actually use and an example of what we think might be useful but isn't.

Standard Ugly Multi-crimper (not useful):
A lot of people end up trying to get these things to "make do".  Mines the exact one in the link and although it's worked there's definitely very very few connectors in this hobby it works for.  They also make a mess of your hands if slightly misused.  This are best used for other purposes like hammering.
https://www.jaycar.com.au/5-way-crimping-tool/p/TH1828


Non-Insulated Crimper:
Now we're talking.  This pair start being useful for automotive and hobby use.  If you squint just right you're see the scalloping in the die that makes the tabs of the connectors wrap into the connector (and the wire insulation) to create a mechanically strong joint.
Unfortunately though they're still not capable of crimping the tiny JST plugs or the other super fine (smaller than 24AWG wire) effectively.  If you do automotive or larger gauge wiring they're perfect for many many connector types.  
https://www.jaycar.com.au/crimping-tool-...s/p/TH1834 (my pair).

JST-SH Non-Insulated Crimper:
Funnily enough when you first decide to make custom JST leads the crimper is a bit harder to find and Hobbyking is one of the few places that carry one specifically for these.  Although the terminals aren't that expensive I still find I don't always get a great crimp - but the finished result of having a completely customised wiring setup in your craft is well worth it.
https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hobbyking-js...-tool.html

The great thing is when you have the right tools, and put them to use your builds will look neater and almost certainly fly and crash better.
[-] The following 2 users Like Aaron's post:
  • unseen, sloscotty
Reply
#9
When it comes to crimping contacts for the most popular RC connector types, there is just one tool that you should consider. The Engineer PA-09 from Japan. Beware of imitations. The real one is a precision instrument and gives perfect results every time, without costing the insane money that Molex want for their crimp tool.



It works with the 1mm pitch JST-SH that are popular on many flight controllers and video transmitters, plus the Molex 1.25mm pitch Picoblade connectors found on other video transmitters and video cameras plus it works for the JST-ZH 1.5mm pitch connectors that are traditionally used to connect a Spektrum satellite receiver.

As Aaron says, there's nothing that beats being able to make your own cables to exactly the right length. If I get something that arrives with leads made from that horrible, non-flexible, PVC insulated cable, the first thing I do is swap them out for a custom cable made with silicone insulated cable. I use 30AWG silicone cable for the Picboblade and JST-SH connectors and 26AWG for the JST-SH ones.
[-] The following 1 user Likes unseen's post:
  • sloscotty
Reply
Login to remove this ad | Register Here
#10
If anyone watched Joshua Bardwell's video today about the nice little TS100 soldering iron, please totally ignore his recommendations for using 400C soldering temperature or higher. This is utterly wrong!

Your iron should be around 330C. If it can't solder a heavy joint at that temperature, even if you are using the correct shaped tip for a heavy soldering job, then the soldering iron does not have enough power. Increasing the temperature to the ridiculous 450C that he talks about is nonsense.

Temperature is not Power!

Soldering at those kind of temperatures will evaporate your flux before it can do its work, will damage the tip of your iron and will damage the glue that holds the tracks onto your circuit board.

I like some of Joshua's videos, but the man can't solder for toffee. He can't strip wires properly either. Using a scalpel to strip the insulation from cables like he does is a really, really bad idea. A pair of good quality manual wire strippers is the correct tool.

Not only is it important to use the right tool for the job, using the tool properly is also a requirement!
Reply
#11
Aye - I vaguely recall back in the day around 280-300 degrees was the sweet spot temperature for fine work - but ultimately you only need to melt the solder, anything more than that is just torching flux, more heat isn't the answer but more thermal mass is.

So if you are doing heavy gauge wires for example use a big blunt tip or a bigger iron that has enough thermal mass to get the joint up to temperature for flowing the solder quickly.

Adding temperature is sort of a hack though, you wind up the iron temperature so that when you apply it to the joint the heat transfer works in your favour with hopefully enough heat getting into the joint to flow the solder. But it does ultimately trash your tips, burns flux quickly and in general probably leads to more bad joints and stuffed up/cooked boards than anything else.

And yeah a lot of Youtubers simply can't solder and incorrectly show poor practices as ok - which does bug some of us old timers (soldering for 30 years here)...
[-] The following 1 user Likes Aaron's post:
  • unseen
Reply
#12
Spot on. I've been soldering since I was 11 and also did it for several years as a job.

There's a huge amount of bad advice out there on YouTube. Being able to post a video (normally taken in portrait mode with a mobile phone Rolleyes), is no guarantee that someone knows what they are talking about.

In Joshua's case, it really grinds my gears when he posts this kind of rubbish as he's a very bright guy who you can normally rely on to present accurate and factual information. That makes it twice as bad when he presents rubbish as facts because people assume he knows what he's talking about.
Reply
Login to remove this ad | Register Here
#13
(12-Apr-2017, 03:46 PM)unseen Wrote: Spot on. I've been soldering since I was 11 and also did it for several years as a job.

There's a huge amount of bad advice out there on YouTube. Being able to post a video (normally taken in portrait mode with a mobile phone Rolleyes), is no guarantee that someone knows what they are talking about.

In Joshua's case, it really grinds my gears when he posts this kind of rubbish as he's a very bright guy who you can normally rely on to present accurate and factual information. That makes it twice as bad when he presents rubbish as facts because people assume he knows what he's talking about.

If there is a world championship in worst joints RC hobbyist would be unbeatable
[-] The following 1 user Likes pips's post:
  • unseen
Reply
#14
(16-Apr-2017, 06:34 PM)pips Wrote: If there is a world championship in worst joints RC hobbyist would be unbeatable

ROFL

So true!

I still have nightmares about some of the soldering I've seen.
[-] The following 1 user Likes unseen's post:
  • pips
Reply
#15
We really should start a grumpy old nerd "get off my PCB" thread about soldering and the travesties that get shown up online.

I'm not saying that my joints are the prettiest, or even examples of "how every joint should be", but I've had no soldering related failures in my R/C hobbies in years yet it seems the norm for peoples builds to fall out of the sky due to some very bad wiring and soldering practice.
[-] The following 1 user Likes Aaron's post:
  • unseen
Reply
Login to remove this ad | Register Here