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Lesson of the day: Screws and Bolts
#1


Pretty exciting topic i know Smile But remember, these are what holds your expensive quad together. Generally, there are two "types" you will use..

Phillips head (small + pattern) - these are ok and easy to use. Good for things that get taken apart a lot.



Hex (small hexagon pattern) - these are great for really getting in tight. The down side is, it is easy to strip the hole (especially if you are using the wrong size in imperial or metric), meaning they can get stuck in whatever your screwing them in to, so be careful.



Then you have different materials:

Nylon: good for not much, maybe your flight controller, but expect them to break in your more hard-core crashes.
Zinc: these are your most common type. They are cheap and light, but they are not the strongest.
Steel/other composite (eg titanium): these are your top shelf items and a must-have for the critical things, like securing motors etc

If you really want to get technical, read up on it all online on wiki, and always ask Smile
[-] The following 1 user Likes sushicanfly's post:
  • Oscar
#2
Proper size allen key or other bit is crucial!
As for allen keys: get yourself keys with ball heads.
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#3
Aluminum hex-heads are pretty nice for everything except motors (for those, I use the steel that comes with the motors, or swap out with stainless steel which I like better).
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#4
Good info guys Smile thanks
Moved to Guide section.
Don't be a LOS'er, be a FPV'er :) -- My Fleet
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#5
(09-05-2016, 11:37 PM)Mikk36 Wrote: Proper size allen key or other bit is crucial!
As for allen keys: get yourself keys with ball heads.

You are actually more likely to destroy the bolt head with those ball allen keys since it will be much less surface area to transfer the applied torque
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#6
One thing you don't have pictured are hex-head button-top screws.  I use aluminum versions of these for frame to standoff connections.  One really nice thing about aluminum, is you can get them in pretty colors  Cool .  (Not to mention that they are lighter than steel.)

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#7
I wish the frame manufacturers started using Torx head instead on those no good hex head bolts



(09-06-2016, 12:32 PM)sloscotty Wrote: One thing you don't have pictured are hex-head button-top screws.  I use aluminum versions of these for frame to standoff connections.  One really nice thing about aluminum, is you can get them in pretty colors  Cool .  (Not to mention that they are lighter than steel.)


How is the quality of those alu bolt heads? I would guess it is much easier to strip the heads on those that the steel bolts?
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#8
(09-06-2016, 12:34 PM)oyvinla Wrote: I wish the frame manufacturers started using Torx head instead on those no good hex head bolts




How is the quality of those alu bolt heads? I would guess it is much easier to strip the heads on those that the steel bolts?

I haven't had any trouble stripping the heads.  I sometimes have stripped out one of the nylon standoffs.  I have a nice accurate set of metric hex-head drivers, and I think that's whats most important to prevent stripping out heads.
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#9
Tips if you ever strip your hex screw hole:
- if it's soft material like zinc/cheap alu, you can just push/work in a very slightly bigger flat screwdriver into the hole ant twist
- on all materials - use a variable speed battery drill with metal drill bit - make sure it's rotating in good direction to unscrew. Go slowly and drill bit will "lock" on the bolt head at some point.
Find me on Youtube and Instagram. I currently fly: NOX5, NOX5RAirblade Assault 130 and drive a scrap RC car
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#10
(09-06-2016, 01:02 PM)KonradS Wrote: Tips if you ever strip your hex screw hole:
- if it's soft material like zinc/cheap alu, you can just push/work in a very slightly bigger flat screwdriver into the hole ant twist
- on all materials - use a variable speed battery drill with metal drill bit - make sure it's rotating in good direction to unscrew. Go slowly and drill bit will "lock" on the bolt head at some point.

One more tip:
- Make a flat cut into the screw head with a rotary power tool kind of Dremel. You can also use a small saw with a blade for metal. Then you just need a flat-blade screwdriver.
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#11
(09-06-2016, 01:02 PM)KonradS Wrote: Tips if you ever strip your hex screw hole:
- if it's soft material like zinc/cheap alu, you can just push/work in a very slightly bigger flat screwdriver into the hole ant twist
- on all materials - use a variable speed battery drill with metal drill bit - make sure it's rotating in good direction to unscrew. Go slowly and drill bit will "lock" on the bolt head at some point.

Got some more ideas about removing stripped screws here :Smile
https://oscarliang.com/remove-stripped-a...um-screws/
Don't be a LOS'er, be a FPV'er :) -- My Fleet
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  • KonradS
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#12
If we are talking about nuts and bolts:
- remember that it should be long enough (get it Wink ? im 13 again Smile ) - if the bolt is only holding 1-2 mm of the thread it will break easily, ensure proper hold by the bolt and give few MM more.. (yes it will add weight)
- remember to have few spare nuts and bolts with you... or your flying session might fly off quite quickly... (i think i have a pun day on munday Smile ) - thanks to having Konrad S with me and his always having a lot of spares i've found that flying nut is not a tragedy... but if konrad wouldn't be there ... i would be grounded now ...
All the best
Grzesiek (Grisha/ Greg)

Curently flyable: Nox 5, Nox 3, Minimalist 112, Scrap
Bench / in progres: fixing
thinking about building: 450
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  • KonradS
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